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Review of Brené Brown’s Braving the Wilderness

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Belonging so much to yourself that you’re willing to stand alone is a wilderness.

Brené Brown puts out incredible work, TED Talks, and literature precisely at the intersection of my nerdy love for psychology, heart for authenticity, and passion for Christianity.  A very wilderness she has braved on her own of merging those worlds of psychology and Christianity together, often facing adversity on both ends.

Professionally, Brené is a researcher.  She is a renowned clinical psychologist with incredible books and talks on bravery and vulnerability.  This book, specifically, looks into the idea of “braving the wilderness” or standing alone in a world or context all your own.  Brené describes knowing your place and beliefs so firmly and having such a strong sense of self that you, as an individual, can healthily enter community with others.

She describes this wilderness, this path from what everyone wants of me and how everyone else has demanded I show up, to becoming who you most authentically are as a wilderness.  A scary path that requires great courage.  It was in this honesty I fell in love again with her authenticity and such precisely fitting interjections of profanity.

Do not think you can be brave with your life and your work and never disappoint anybody.  It doesn’t work that way.

Brené dives deeply into research regarding loneliness.  While my generation of millennials are the most connected generation of all time, maintaining regular contact with exponentially more people on an hourly basis than ever in human history, we are reportedly the generation most starved for true authentic connection.  Her research describes how such loneliness, such absence of deep and meaningful connection effects our entire beings, including our physical health.  Yet, it’s an ache we’re unwilling to admit.  An ache which carries great shame, often the shame of rejection or the terrifying belief that maybe that little voice in our head that keeps on whispering “You are not enough.”  is right.

Denying that you feel lonely makes no more sense than denying that you feel hungry.

Beyond loneliness, Brené unpacks the difficulty of relationships and the courage they often require.

Pretending everything is okay is not loyalty or love.  That’s fear.


Here’s the heart of this review:

I deeply love Brené and will forever and always support all things she publishes.  I loved this book, have recommended it to others, and would love to read it again.

Here’s my disclaimer:  This book has some political parts that at a couple points made me want to stop reading (Insert your millennial jokes here.).  So don’t let it derail you.  There is great information in this book that I’ve found myself often quoting in my head.

People are hard to hate from close up.  Move in.


And in the vein of the lack of connectedness, if you feel like you are lacking when it comes to friends, let’s talk.  Comment below to start a conversation, because people need people.

 

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Thanks for stopping by!  My name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story, primarily in the sudden loss of my precious Dad on my 22nd birthday.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

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